How to choose an AMR

Choosing The Right AMR System

Autonomous Mobile Robots (AMRs) are the future of warehouse and retail automation. Over the past few years, robotics technology has advanced to the point where using AMRs to improve the efficiency and versatility of your warehouse can be a realistic and practical investment. If you’re considering whether an AMR solution would make sense for your business, we’re here to help.

At Fetch Robotics, we understand how complicated it can be to make the right decision about a new AMR system. It’s much more than just looking at a spec sheet: the payload, speed, and battery life of robot platforms are certainly relevant, but there are a variety of nuances to autonomous mobile robot deployments that are important to consider as well. For example, how complex is it to integrate your new AMR fleet? How will your AMRs know where to go, and what if you want to make changes? Can AMRs truly work safely around people, pallets, forklifts, and all of the other things that are going on in your warehouse on a daily basis? And what exactly are the differences between modern AMRs and the older generation of Autonomous Guided Vehicles (AGVs)?

We’ve put together a series of articles designed to give you the information you need to answer these questions for yourself. These articles provide context for evaluating different AMRs in the market to help you choose the right AMR system for you. We want you to be as confident in your decision as we are in our robots!

More Topics

Mapping

Reliable and resilient maps are critical to smooth autonomous mobile robot (AMR) operation. The best AMRs build maps quickly and can accommodate frequent changes.

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Obstacle Avoidance

Safety is a key consideration when deploying autonomous mobile robots (AMRs) in any environment. Best of breed AMRs can not only detect obstacles but also anticipate out-of-view or in-motion objects to avoid collisions.

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Human Robot Interface

One of the defining features of robots of all kinds is an element of autonomy: they’re designed to do what you want them to do more or less by themselves, or at the very least without requiring constant supervision.

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